Meprolight MOR

Don’t let the MOR’s aura of sophistication fool you; it is still built for the same rough use the simpler M21 is built to take.

Like the M21, the MOR’s reticle is powered by ambient light through a fiber optic collector system and by tritium for zero light conditions and is night vision compatible. Since the standard reticle is a fine 3 MOA dot for precision, the reticle also can be illuminated electronically for difficult lighting situations.

On either side of the aperture a laser is built into the sight. On the left side is a red visible laser, and on the right is an IR laser. A momentary PTT switch on a cable activates the lasers. The two lasers and the reticle zero simultaneously, so as the reticle is zeroed, the lasers are also zeroed. A simple switch on the left side of the sight has the following positions:

Off: Reticle is passively lit, lasers are off.
1: First level of electronic reticle illumination, PTT switch activates visible laser
2: Second level of electronic reticle illumination, PTT switch activates visible laser
3: Highest level of electronic reticle illumination, PTT switch activates visible laser
L: Reticle is passively lit, PTT switch activates visible laser
IR: Reticle is passively lit, PTT switch activates IR laser

On the front of the Mepro MOR are two caps that provide access to the battery compartments. The MOR uses two AA batteries (for easy procurement). If there is one live battery in either battery compartment, the sight will function. A battery in each compartment (two total) doubles the battery life, but only one battery is required for operation. Each battery powers a separate complete electrical circuit, so even of one electrical circuit fails (very unlikely), the second circuit will keep the sight functional.

The PTT pressure switch and cable can be user-replaced, so if it becomes damaged, the sight does not need to be sent back to the manufacturer. The cable is reinforced where it attaches to the sight, preventing a common type of damage to pressure switch cables. The switch can be used with or without an included velcro strap.

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The MOR is used extensively by IDF Navy SEALs in (and under) the salt water and is sealed against water or salt damage.

The Meprolight MOR sight is used mainly by IDF special operations units and can be seen on M16s, Tavors, AKs, and various Galil and Uzi models.

The Mepro MOR is by far the most advanced reflex sight system in use by the IDF. It is not an inexpensive optic, but when the economy of a passively/electronically illuminated reflex sight and both visible and IR lasers, redundant electronics, and a compact package are considered, it is not really too expensive. In the US the Mepro MOR is available in a civilian version and a military and police version. The civilian version has only the visible laser and the M&P version has both visible and IR lasers. Externally they look identical. Both versions are available with either dot or bullseye reticles, but the dot reticle is correct for an IDF carbine, and fits the purpose of the sight better.

This sight is appropriate for an IDF special forces build, and looks best on a flat-top AR, a Tavor, an AK with a VFR-AK rail system, or one of the newer Galil or Uzi models.

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2 thoughts on “Meprolight MOR

  1. Shalom,

    My ordnance M4 issued to our kitat konenut has a handle (not flat top). Where and how would it be best to place the Mepro Mor sight? CAA sells TR16 Picarinny Rail for Carry Handle but wouldn’t it make the sight to high then?

    What do you think of MSE AQC as an alternative to Mepro Mor? I understand MSE doesn’t exist any more but it seems that Halpensis.co.il has still some of these sights in stock.

    Thank you for your time and for your help.

    Ilan

    • I would recommend replacing the handguards with a drop-in aluminum rail system, such as the FAB Defense NFR. The MOR can be mounted on the top rail of the rail system in front of the carry handle, and the iron sights can still be used through the MOR. This keeps the MOE at the correct height for a good cheek weld, allows the iron sights to be used if necessary, and is a much better solution than trying to mount the sight high on top of the carry handle. I have used the MOR in this configuration and will post a photo as I have time.
      I prefer the Mepro MOR to the MSE AQC.

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